Building a Cotton Press in 15mm

After building the Southern Mansion, I wanted to add more structures which would have belonged to Civil War plantation complexes. One of the most characteristic landmarks was the cotton press. This large wooden structure consisted of a screw mechanism and a wooden compartment into which the cotton and a piece of cloth bagging was put. By turning the screw, the cotton was pressed into a bale. The bag was then stitched together and bound with rope.

 

My model of a cotton press is mainly made out of match sticks and thin strips of wood. I often use old plastic cards for bases – they are thin, don’t bend or warp and have a good size for many 15mm structures. The cotton compartment was built up with matchsticks. The press part was made out of balsa wood and two dice frames. For the screw, I just took an ordinary screw. I also decided to use a clear acrylic rod as a buttress because I didn’t trust the stability of my construction.

Around those two parts, I built up the framework with thin strips of wood. After priming, I painted and drybrushed it to give the impression of weathered wood.

In my lead pile, I found a spare mule (well, I found several – for some reasons I’ve amassed a lot of mules!) to which I added a harness with bits of a paper clip and paper. I also made some cotton bales out of Green Stuff. They are based on a period painting and, while not perfect, were easy enough to make.

And this is the finished cotton press:

Belonging to the production infrastructure of the South, cotton presses were often destroyed by Union troops. My model will make a fine objective for games of Sharp Practice.

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TooFatLardies Games Day in Vienna

It’s no secret that TooFatLardies are my favourite rules publisher. Fortunately, there are a couple of like-minded individuals around. Last Friday, a bunch of us got together to play and present TFL games. The idea was to showcase the rules and induce people who have never before played a Lardy game to give it a try.

We had four games prepared: Dux Britanniarum, Sharp Practice 2, Kiss me Hardy! and Chain of Command.

As we’ve written a short report for Lard Island News (which will be published shortly), I’m not going to repeat myself but refer the reader to this blog. Sigur has also written a very fine report on the Battle Brush Studios blog – head over there for more information!

I just want to thank everyone involved: Those who prepared and presented games, those who played and those who watched and contributed to the friendly and welcoming atmosphere. I’m especially happy that I had the opportunity to meet up with old friends and make new ones.

Certainly an event to be repeated!

Here are some impressions from the games:

Sharp Practice (hosted by me)

Dux Britanniarum (hosted by Sigur and Virago)

Kiss me Hardy! (hosted by Annatar)

Chain of Command (hosted by Sigur and Shlominus, with a scenario by Slowik)

Building a Southern Mansion

One of the most characteristic buildings of the Civil War South is the plantation house or mansion. Often built in a sumptuous neoclassicist style, it served as the home for the planter and his family. Many examples survive and a quick internet search reveals a number of inspirational images.

My project started with a quick sketch and an outline of the necessary parts which would make up the building. Those were then cut out of plastic sheet. I then glued on windows and doors from Auhagen. Those are made for H0 model railways and are in 1/87, but they work perfect with 15mm figures.

I by all means wanted to have the characteristic weatherboarding effect and decided to cover the walls with thin strips of cardboard. This is labour-intensive work but the result looks rather nice. By the way, it turns out that the best cardboard for this purpose comes from spaghetti boxes – a welcome excuse to eat even more pasta!

The walls were assembled and the structure was strengthened with some pieces of wood. My models are gaming pieces and I always build them to survive the rough handling of eager wargamers.

WallsAssembled

For the columns of the balcony, I used wooden dowels. They have a nice structure but of course no capital; however, I decided I could live with that.

The rails of the balcony were made from fancy toothpicks I nicked at a buffet – when I saw them, I immediately knew they would be perfect for such a project!

WallsAssembled2

I decided to make a removable roof and built a quick mock-up out of cardboard. This is something I sometimes do with more complex structures – I’m prone to making errors in my calculations, so it’s better to check it before cutting the wrong shapes out of plastic.

RoofMockup

The roof shingles were made out of cardboard – again a mind-numbing work but the result looks nice.

When everything was finished, I assembled the whole structure, primed and painted it. And that’s how it looks:

A Scrap in Colony Town – 15mm Sci-Fi AAR

K. and I have been playing a lot of Sharp Practice recently, as we’ve been playtesting scenarios for the booklet I’m preparing. We suddenly felt like we needed a change and wanted to play something completely different. Remembering the whimsical and colourful figures of my 15mm science fiction collection, we got them out and set up a game.

We used our home-brewed rules Wandering Star and started with the pre-game phase. Dicing for forces, K. got the better end, having better quality troops and one additional group as a bunch of trigger-happy locals joined her forces. The scenario we played was number 9, Follow the Clue.

The small colony town is still peaceful… The two objectives are situated in the middle of the table, one to the right of the creek opposite of the communications building, the other to the left of the creek between the bunker and the hill.

K. deployed a lot of her troops on her left flank: The fierce Brunt, a group of Pasiphaeans, her special operatives and the eager locals. On her right flank, her Sharkmen advanced threateningly.

I had one group of Quar and a bike on my right flank, while the rest deployed to the other side of the creek. I decided that I would go for the objective to my left and advanced cautiously while K.’s Brunt rushed forward. Having put my teams on overwatch, it was not too hard to discourage the Pasiphaeans to keep their hands off the crates. They fell back severely mauled, but meanwhile, K. had brought her second wave forward. Also, the groups from her left flank had positioned themselves to shoot at my guys covering the objective, causing some casualties among my Auxies. I was now on the defensive while K. brought her Brunt forward to capture the objective.

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Across the creek on my right flank, the Quar on the speeder bike had first added to the covering fire targeting the objective. When K. advanced her other troops, it fell back. As I saw that I was stuck on the left flank, I decided to try to speedily grab the other objective in a surprise move. The bike and a lone group of Quar rushed forward. However, the bike suddenly came under fire from K.’s special ops.

When her pesky locals joined the fray, the rickety vehicle blew up.

With the bike, my hopes of achieving the right-hand objective went up in smoke.

On the other riverside, the Brunt needed a couple of rounds to figure out how to open the crate – they had to perform and intelligence check, which is not their strength – but there was not much I could do to stop them.

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The game ended with a victory for K.!

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It’s been a while since we’ve played Wandering Star. There are some things that bug me about the rules, but K. thinks that’s just because I wrote them myself. She’s happy to play them and they give a fast and fun game, so I guess I’ll stick to them.

The game also motivated me to rummage through my lead pile looking for more 15mm sci-fi figures. I realised that I’ve got enough to create a whole new force! I’ve already prepared a couple for painting…